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Collective art making in an open group increases the social connectedness of young people who experience psychosis : the use of art groups to reduce the consequences of negative symptoms of psychosis / Alan Watters

By: Publication details: [Auckland, N.Z : Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design], 2010.Description: 58 pages : colour illustarions, figures ; 30 cmSubject(s): Genre/Form: Online resources: Abstract: AbstractThis was a phenomenological study using qualitative data to explore the experiences of five participants in an art grouprun in a community setting as part of the ‘Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI)’Service based in West Auckland. The aim of the study was to establish if the participants experienced a sense of bonding with their peersand if they felt in control over their interactions with others in the group, which would increase self-efficacy.The participants engaged in at least one art group, completed a questionnaire, attended a semi-structured interview with a series of pre-set questions and observational data was collectedby facilitators and the researcher. Data was analysed and areas of interest were identified. Themes relating to group dynamics and self perception emerged from the data,including trust, safety, control, levels of isolation, social opportunities, identity and the potential for bridging into the wider community. Three of the five participants felt that they strongly bonded with the group. The remaining two had less of a sense of belonging,but all felt they had opportunities to be actively involved in the group and produce art work. One group member showed an interest in art beyond the group and started looking for art classes to attend in the wider community setting. While the numbers in this study are small the findings are consistent with overseas studies in the United Kingdom (UK), the United States of America (USA)and Australia.
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In partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Masters of Arts in Art Therapy (Clinical), Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, 2010.

Keywords: mental health,psychosis, early intervention, group art-making

Includes bibliographical references.

AbstractThis was a phenomenological study using qualitative data to explore the experiences of five participants in an art grouprun in a community setting as part of the ‘Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI)’Service based in West Auckland. The aim of the study was to establish if the participants experienced a sense of bonding with their peersand if they felt in control over their interactions with others in the group, which would increase self-efficacy.The participants engaged in at least one art group, completed a questionnaire, attended a semi-structured interview with a series of pre-set questions and observational data was collectedby facilitators and the researcher. Data was analysed and areas of interest were identified. Themes relating to group dynamics and self perception emerged from the data,including trust, safety, control, levels of isolation, social opportunities, identity and the potential for bridging into the wider community. Three of the five participants felt that they strongly bonded with the group. The remaining two had less of a sense of belonging,but all felt they had opportunities to be actively involved in the group and produce art work. One group member showed an interest in art beyond the group and started looking for art classes to attend in the wider community setting. While the numbers in this study are small the findings are consistent with overseas studies in the United Kingdom (UK), the United States of America (USA)and Australia.

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